Equine and Canine Shiatsu Massage

Equine and Canine Shiatsu Massage Therapy is a healing touch modality which has translated the art of traditional Japanese shiatsu massage for humans to the equine and canine system. Over decades, professionals have drawn on the knowledge of meridians, extraordinary vessels and acupuncture/pressure points to perfect this method. In a thorough equine or canine shiatsu massage hundreds of the identified acupressure points (stress or organ points) of the horse or canine are activated and cleared facilitating proper energy flow which results in a more balanced horse from both a physical and energetic perspective.


This technique directly accesses the sensory and motor neurons of the central nervous system including the autonomic, somatic, sympathetic, parasympathetic and vestibular systems thus affecting the function, balance, coordination and movement (agility) of the body.


Shiatsu massage utilizes acupressure. Acupressure is a traditional oriental (Chinese) medicine which identifies meridians as "energy channels" that carry the life force energy known as qi (chee) to activate internal processes, movement and thought.


Excerpt from Diana Thompson's book Acupressure Point Charts for Horses: 

"Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) refers to an ancient body of healing methods that is at least 3,000 years old. The goal of these methods was and is to prevent disease by creating full physical and emotional health.


At one point in history, TCM practitioners were assigned to help the people of a specific geographic area stay healthy. They prescribed wellness programs for each person that might include certain foods, herbs, acupressure points, breathing and movement exercises, and lifestyle advice.


One unique aspect of this system was that if the client became ill while following the practitioner's advice the practitioner had to treat the client for free. This emphasis on using a proactive approach to create wellness and prevent disease is found in writings dating back to the third century B.C."


Traditional Oriental (Chinese) Medicine, Acupressure amd Massage are now considered  complementary* care by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.


*According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Click here to be directed to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health website. Click here to be directed to more information regarding our healing philosophies.


For more information about Equine Shiatsu Massage Therapy,  Acupressure and the emerging contemporary science behind this modality of body work please see our Body Work Resources page or contact us.

Biodynamic Acupressure

Biodynamic Acupressure is an energetic healing modality based on the meridians and extraordinary vessels defined by traditional oriental (Chinese) medical principles of acupressure. These meridians and channels correlate to the sensory and motor neurons of the central nervous system and its' various counterparts which affect all systems of the body.


I facilitate this work through a no touch or very light touch approach. You will note in the photo gallery that most of the horses and animals I work with are NOT restrained. (Shiatsu massage does require some level of restraint as pictured on this page) Animals are restrained only when the physical conditions call for it. Animals know when they are being harmed and when they are being helped; they intuitively choose to receive healing, or not,  if they feel it is in their best interest to do so.


Traditional oriental (Chinese) medicine identifies meridians as "energy channels" that carry the life force energy known as qi (chee) to activate internal processes, movement and thought.


Traditional Oriental (Chinese) Medicine, Acupressure and Massage are now considered  complementary* care by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.


*According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Click here to be directed to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health website. Click here to be directed to more information regarding our healing philosophies.


For more information about Acupressure and the emerging contemporary science behind this modality of body work please see our Body Work Resources page or contact us.

Craniosacral

These modalities overlap and are focused on identifying and clearing blocks in the nervous system where sensory and motor neurons affect the functioning of all organs, glands,  muscles, bones and systems of the body.


In the early part of the 20th century an osteopathic physician, William Sutherland, began to study the structure, function and movement of the bones and connective tissue (sutures) in the human skull in relation to the health, symmetry and balance of the body. He began by experimenting on himself, moving his bones and taking note of the resulting physical symptoms he experienced in his body.


[This section is currently being updated]


For more information about Craniosacral, Muscle Reset and Somatic Release please see our Body Work Resources page or contact us.




 *Always seek traditional Medical or licensed Veterinary care. Heart of the Horse promotes holistic balance through an integrative care and treatment model as defined by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Our work is not intended to be a substitute for traditional Medical or licensed Veterinary care; we do not diagnose or prescribe treatment. 

ANIMAL COMMUNICATION AND ENERGY WORK DISCLAIMER

Always seek licensed Medical or Veterinary care. Heart of the Horse promotes holistic balance through an integrative care and treatment model as defined by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Our work is complementary and is not intended to be a substitute for traditional Medical or Veterinary care; we do not diagnose or prescribe treatment.


ANIMAL COMMUNICATION AND ENERGY WORK DISCLAIMER: 


When you book an appointment with Ginny you acknowledge and agree that working with Ginny does not preclude or prevent you from seeing a medical doctor, veterinarian or psychotherapist. Working with Ginny is not a medical, veterinary, psychological, or clinical relationship. An Animal Communicator, Medical Intuitive or Energy Worker cannot legally diagnose any condition or prescribe treatment. If you or your animal are experiencing what you perceive to be a severe or sudden medical condition, please seek medical or veterinary care, your family physician, dentist, psychotherapist, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room. 


Ginny strongly advises that you seek appropriate medical, mental health and veterinary care, in addition to any work that you may undertake with her. 


Heart of the Horse promotes biodynamic (body, mind and spirit) balance through an Integrative Health Care* model as defined by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Our work is considered "complementary" care and is not intended to be a substitute for traditional licensed medical or veterinary care; we do not diagnose or prescribe treatment. Our goal, through the use of Acupressure, Shiatsu, Animal Communication and Energy Medicine, is to help restore balance to the energy, mind and physical body of both people and animals. Trapped energies such as emotions, trauma and memories often create blocks and distortion in the body. These distortions result in an imbalance which interferes with the proper physiological and psychological functioning of the body and contribute to the development of disease. 


Science has proven that Energy Medicine has a significant impact on all of the systems and functions of the body, including but not limited to: increasing the circulation of blood and oxygen flow, promoting relaxation and healing, releasing toxins and endorphins, building enzymes, regulating hormones and the immune system.  (Click here for an informative article.) 


Please see our Volunteerism and Advocacy page (under the About Ginny menu option) to find out more about the efforts to further legitimize alternative healing modalities and to impact the current opioid crisis in our nation.  *According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, Integrative Health Care, Complementary Medicine and Alternative Medicine are defined as follows: There are many definitions of “integrative” health care, but all involve bringing conventional and "complementary" or "alternative" approaches together in a coordinated way. The use of integrative approaches to health and wellness has grown within care settings across the United States. Researchers are currently exploring the potential benefits of integrative health in a variety of situations, including pain management for military personnel and veterans, relief of symptoms in cancer patients and survivors, and programs to promote healthy behaviors.  

  • If a non-mainstream practice is used together with conventional medicine, it’s considered “complementary.”
  • If a non-mainstream practice is used in place of conventional medicine, it’s considered “alternative.” 

Click here to be directed to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health website.